Simple, beautiful & ad-free. Read the manifesto:

Thank you Captain.

(Source: everynight-yankeenight)

NYTCA Graphic Standards Manual

timemagazine:

TIME’s new cover: Never Offline. The Apple Watch is just the start. How wearable tech will change your life 
janetmillslove:

Lightning over Tusco moment love

janetmillslove:

Lightning over Tusco moment love

(via fabforgottennobility)

fabforgottennobility:

disastriovunque:

 

Lightning II

trystan-stuff:

What they saw.

(via han-chew)

(Source: theholocron, via han-chew)

fastcodesign:

5 Coffee Gadgets For Design Snobs

Including flavor-boosting brew blocks, a French press designed to last a lifetime, and more.

Read More>

(via fastcompany)

"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”

"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”

micdotcom:

3 reasons Mo’Ne Davis’ ‘Sports Illustrated’ cover is an ever bigger deal that you realize 

1. When there’s a woman on the cover, she’s almost always with a man — or in a swimsuit.
When a woman is featured on the SI cover, she’s most often either in a swimsuit or accompanied by a man — like UConn’s Diana Taurasi with Emeka Okafor in 2003 or UNC’s Rashanda McCants with Tyler Hansbrough in 2008. Covers featuring actual female athletes by themselves are exceedingly rare, with only the U.S. gymnastics team (i2012) and Hope Solo (20011) getting the call in recent years.
A woman on the cover is exceedingly rare | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

3 reasons Mo’Ne Davis’ ‘Sports Illustrated’ cover is an ever bigger deal that you realize 

1. When there’s a woman on the cover, she’s almost always with a man — or in a swimsuit.

When a woman is featured on the SI cover, she’s most often either in a swimsuit or accompanied by a man — like UConn’s Diana Taurasi with Emeka Okafor in 2003 or UNC’s Rashanda McCants with Tyler Hansbrough in 2008. Covers featuring actual female athletes by themselves are exceedingly rare, with only the U.S. gymnastics team (i2012) and Hope Solo (20011) getting the call in recent years.

A woman on the cover is exceedingly rare Follow micdotcom

megazal:

untitled by Ryan Halliwill on Flickr.